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THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.
THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT
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THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT             

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT

1917 PAGE 2

 

THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS in 1917

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT.

 

Published in the Reporter 12th May 1917.

POPULAR TERRITORIAL N.C.O.

HIT BY A STRAY SHELL WHILE GOING TO SEE THE DOCTOR.

An official confirmation of the news, which had reached her from another source of the death of her son, Sergeant (2441) 350826 PERCY BRAY, has been received by Mrs Bray of 93, Grosvenor Street, Ashton.

Sgt. BRAY was killed in action on April 18th, presumably by a stray shell whilst he was going to see the doctor.

Sgt. BRAY had an exemplary character, and was one of the most popular NCO's in the 2/9th Manchester Regiment which he joined in September 1914. He made himself an efficient drill instructor and did good work at both Southport and Cressborough. He was 39 years of age and unmarried. He formerly worked as a Minder at the Minerva Spinning Co. and had attended St. Peters Church. (Percy Bray is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery).CLICK HERE TO VIEW PERCY BRAY'S GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

 

   

 

Published in the Reporter 12th May 1917.

"A WELL TRIED WARRIOR"

ASHTON TERRITORIAL KILLED.

Mrs McClusky, of 126, Cavendish Street, Ashton, has been informed of the death of her husband, Pte. 350582 HARRY McCLUSKY, one of the 1st/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment in France on April 29th, by a message from the chaplain and by a comrade who is over on short leave (Pte. GEORGE McCREA.) On Wednesday, Major JOHN  BROADBENT, who is also over on leave, called and tendered the condolences of the officers and men of the Ashton Territorials to Mrs. McClusky. He said that Pte. McCLUSKY was one of the old boys of the Ninth, and was very popular and well liked by everyone. The message sent by the chaplain stated that Pte. H. McCLUSKY was killed by shellfire on April 29th. "All that I hear of your husband from his officers and comrades makes me know what a fine and well-tried warrior your husband was. You must indeed be proud of him. Many of his officers and comrades were at the graveside to join in our prayers for him and for all you at home".

Pte. McCLUSKY was 28 years of age. He leaves a widow and four children under seven years of age. He went out to Egypt with the First and Ninth, being accompanied by his brother, FRANK McCLUSKY, who has been invalided out of the battalion. Another brother, JIM McCLUSKY, has been also discharged after being badly gassed. The father, Pte. FRANK McCLUSKY is also serving. Pte. HARRY McCLUSKY worked as a miner at the New Moss Colliery. (Harry McClusky is buried in the Tincourt New British Cemetery). CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE GRAVE OF HARRY McCLUSKY

  

 

Published in the Reporter 12th May 1917.

ONE OF THE 2/9th WHO HAS MET HIS DEATH IN FRANCE.

Pte.351639 WILFRED BATTY, 2/9th Manchesters, son of Mr & Mrs Joseph Batty of 13, Wellbeck Street, Ashton, was killed in France on April 20th. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Hall & Kays, Guidebridge, and enlisted two years ago, leaving Colchester  for France five weeks since. He attended St. Peters Church, Ashton, as well as the day and Sunday school. His brother, Pte. JOSEPH BATTY of the 1st/9th Manchesters is also in France, after going through the Egyptian and Dardanelle campaign. Another brother,  WILLIAM BATTY, is in the Naval Air Service, and stationed in London.  Major E.H.SCOTT has written the following letter to Pte. BATTY'S parents: - "Dear Mr & Mrs Batty, I am writing to you on behalf of his comrades to express their sympathy to you on account of the death of your son. I hope it will be a consolation to you to know that he was doing his duty at the time. He was always a steady soldier, and we shall miss him very much. His death was absolutely instantaneous. I am enclosing a cheque for 8s.4d, being the value of a ten franc note we found in his kit - Believe me, yours faithfully, E.H.SCOTT, Major". (Wilfred Batty is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery). CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE GRAVE OF WILFRED BATTY.  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 26th May 1917.

ASHTON CO-OP EMPLOYEE.

TERRITORIAL KILLED IN ACTION.

Private 350840 HERBERT CHRISTIAN, aged 22, of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs W. CHRISTIAN, undertakers, 85, Katherine Street, Ashton, formerly a grocers assistant  employed by the Ashton Co-operative Society at their Blandford Street shop, has been killed in action.

(Herbert Christian is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).

 

 

 

 

Published on the Reporter 26th May 1917.

FAMILY OF FIGHTERS.

TWO SONS KILLED. 

Mrs T. VERRALL of Dukinfield has received official notification that her son, Private 352014 JAMES HOWARD of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment was killed in action in France on May 7th whilst taking part in  military operations connected with his Company. Pte. HOWARD was 22 years of age, and joined the Army in September in 1915. Previous to joining, he was an apprentice boilermaker at Messrs. Daniel Adamson & Sons, Hyde. He was connected to St. Marks Church and Sunday school, and took an interest in football and other recreations connected with the school.

Major T.E. HOWARD O.C, A Company 1/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment writes: - " Dear Mrs Verrall, It is with deep regret that I have to inform you of a great loss. Your  son, Pte. J. HOWARD took part in some operations undertaken by "A" Company on the night of the 7th inst. As he was returning with the Company, a bullet caught him and he fell down dead. There was no pain or suffering, and I could hardly realise that he was dead as he lay quietly with a smile on his face. Please accept my deepest sympathy with you in your great loss. Your son was a good soldier, and like so many others has been called to give his all for the cause of the right. He, with others, was buried at a cemetery near, which will be always cared for as a bit of England".  It is only nine months ago since Mrs Verrall lost her eldest son, Pte. PERCY HOWARD, who died in September 1916. He was married, and resided at 141, Cotton St. Ashton. Mrs Verrall's first husband, who was the father of the son's referred to above, was also associated with the Army. He went through the Boer War Campaign, and was afterwards employed as a shunter at Dukinfield Station, where he accidentally met his death.  She married again about three years ago and her husband Pte. THOMAS VERRALL is now serving in the Army Service Corps as a field baker. He has also served in the Boer War, and has now been out in France for about two years. He has two sons in the Army, Pte. GEORGE VERRALL, 1/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, aged 20 years, who joined about the same time as his stepbrother, JAMES HOWARD, and was his constant companion. His other son, Pte. THOMAS HENRY VERRALL is at present training with the Reserve Battalion. (James Howard is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 26th May 1917.

FATHER AND SON.

Fought Side by Side and Both Killed.

Mrs Handley of 126, Cotton Street, Ashton, whose husband, Corporal ROBERT HANDLEY was killed during the glorious charge of the Ashton Territorials in Gallipoli on June 7th 1915, which was led by Captain F. HAMER and Lieutenant A.E. STRINGER, has received news of the death in France of her son, Pte. 350431 WILLIAM HANDLEY, who was also in the Ninth Battalion, and went out to Egypt with his father, when he was but 16 years of age. Shortly after his fathers death, Pte. HANDLEY was invalided home through shock, but not before he had fought nobly, and well with Lieutenant W. FORSHAW, when the latter won the V.C. in the Vineyard. Pte. HANDLEY went back out to Egypt for the second time last Christmas, and accompanied the Battalion to France.

Major T.E. HOWORTH, O.C. A Company writes: - "It is with deep sorrow I have to tell you of a heavy loss you have to bear. I know that already you have been called upon to give your husband, and now I have to tell you that your son has been called upon to make the supreme sacrifice. May strength be given you to bear this deepest sorrow. Pte. HANDLEY came out with me in September 1914, and later rejoined us in Egypt. I knew him pretty well, and in the old days in Egypt it was nice to see father and son together, as they are now, although we cannot see them.

Your son was with my Company in an advance on the night of May 6/7th. During that advance he was struck by a bullet and instantly Killed, I saw him afterwards. There was no disfigurement on his face. His body was laid to rest along side that of one of his friends, L/Cpl. STANLEY GREEN of Ryecroft House, in a British cemetery near here"Pte. WILLIAM HANDLEY was 19 years of age. He worked as a piecer at the ?? Tame Valley. (William Handley is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).

 

  

Published in the Reporter 2nd June 1917.

FIVE BROTHERS SERVING.

The Youngest An Ashton Territorial Killed in Action.

Mr & Mrs GREEN of Ryecroft House, Ryecroft St. Ashton, have been informed by Major T.E. HOWORTH of the death of the youngest of their five sons who are serving. Lance Corporal 351697 STANLEY GREEN, of the Ashton Territorials. Corporal GREEN used to belong to the Boys Brigade which was commanded by Major HOWORTH in connection with Ryecroft Church. In his letter, Major HOWORTH said that he was glad to find Lance Corporal GREEN in his Company when he rejoined in Egypt. Lance Corporal GREEN was killed instantly whilst going forward in an attack on the night of 6th and 7th May. "He was a good lad and soldier," added Major HOWORTH. "It was only about a week or ten days since I recommended him for the Lance Corporal stripe". One son of Mr & Mrs GREEN has been discharged out of the Army. The others who are still serving are : Sergt. HAROLD GREEN (Duke of Wellington's Own), now reported to be wounded. Acting Sergeant Major ERNEST GREEN in Salonika, and Private ARTHUR GREEN, who is serving in the Manchester Regiment in India. (Stanley Green is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 2nd June 1917.

Private JOSEPH APLIN

"Life and Soul of His Platoon."

News was received last weekend by Mr. John Aplin, of 19, Keb Lane, Bardsley, of the death in action of his youngest son, Private 351342 JOSEPH APLIN, 2/9th Manchester Regiment. The information was contained in a letter from his officer, Second Lieut. J. DONNELEY, who paid the deceased soldier a very fine tribute. The letter was dated May 23rd, and said - "It is with extreme regret that I have to inform you of the death of your son, Private JOSEPH APLIN from shell wounds received yesterday. We had come out of the line the night before, and were in rest billets when your son was hit. He was rendered unconscious, and died in a few hours, so that he felt no pain. I cannot say how we all miss him, for he was the life and soul of the platoon, always cheery, no matter what the circumstances. He had been on a raid with me the other night, entering into it with his usual keenness and pluck, and had come through it all without so much as a scratch. Of course, it is impossible for us to know the great sorrow this letter must cause you, but all the Company wish me to express their heartfelt sympathy with you in your loss. In spite of everything, however, it will be a comfort to you to know that your son, although but a lad, died a man's death for his country's sake." Private JOSEPH APLIN was only 19 years of age. He enlisted when only 17, and had been in the Army for two years before being sent to the front. He went to France about three months ago. He was previously a collier, employed at the Bardsley Pit, and he was a scholar at Bardsley Church School, and an attender of the church. His father, Mr. John Aplin is an ex soldier and an ex policeman. He served in the Afghanistan War, and when the late King Edward, then Prince of Wales, visited India in 1875 Mr. Aplin formed one of his guard of honour. Mr. Aplin was then in the 2nd Queen's Regiment, and after leaving the Army he served in the police forces successfully at Cardiff, Bromwich and Bristol. (Joseph Aplin is buried Bethune Town Cemetery).

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter June 9th 1917.

WATERLOO SOLDIER KILLED.

Territorial Who Was Twice Wounded.

In Waterloo the deepest sympathy has been expressed to Mrs. THOMAS in the loss she has sustained of her only son, Private 350379 ROBERT ALLEN L THOMAS, 1/9th Manchester Regiment, Ashton Territorials. He was killed in action on May 16th, and information to that effect was conveyed to his mother from the War Office this week. Previously she had received a letter from his Commanding Officer, Major Howarth, dated May 18th, which said as follows: -"It is with very deep regret that I have to write and tell you of a heavy loss you have received. Your son, Pte. R.A.L.THOMAS was with his Company in the trenches this week and whilst on sentry duty on the 16th inst. he was shot by a sniper. He just fell back dead; there was no pain or suffering at all. His body was laid to rest in a cemetery near by, alongside those of some of his comrades who had fallen last week. I am very sorry indeed..." (Robert Allen L Thomas is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).

 

  

Published in the Reporter 9th June 1917.

GALLANT SOLDIER.

Captain Kershaw's Tribute to An Ashton Territorial.

 Mr. & Mrs. TINDALL, of 2, Wood Street, Ashton, have been notified by the military authorities that their son, Pte. JOHN TINDALL, of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, was killed in action by a sniper on May 7th.

Pte. 350504 TINDALL joined the 1/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment before the war broke out, and was well liked and respected by all who knew him for his marked ability in the execution of his duty. He went through the Gallipoli engagements, where he was slightly wounded, and subsequently invalided home suffering from dysentery. He was placed in hospital in Manchester, and afterwards sent to Blackpool where he recovered, and was drafted out to Egypt, and then to France, where he had been with his Regiment about three months. He was 19 years of age, and formerly was employed as a piecer at the Minerva Spinning Co. He was connected to St. Mary's Catholic Church and Sunday School, and was a bugler in the Boy's Brigade. (John Tindall is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).  

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 18th June 1917.

HURST SOLDIER KILLED.

Joined the Territorials on the Outbreak of War.

Official news has been received by Mrs Platt, of 171, Whiteacre Road, Hurst, that her son, Pte. 350941 HAROLD ROWE, had died from wounds on 7th June.  Pte. HAROLD ROWE joined the 2/9th Battalion Territorials in September 1914, and proceeded to France in March last. He was 26 years of age. Prior to joining the Army he was in the employ of Mr A. Herberts, painter and decorator, King St. Hurst, and was highly respected by a large number of friends.

The following letter, supplemented by one from one of his colleagues, Corporal BARDSLEY, announcing his death, has been received by Mrs Platt -  "Dear Mrs. Platt, I deeply regret to inform you that your son, Pte. H. ROWE has been admitted to the Clearing Station. He is wounded in the arm and neck and the doctors tell me that the wounds are serious indeed. I saw him today and tried to give him some comfort. I prayed with him and that seemed to make him happy. He said to me, "write to my mother, but do not make her anxious". Poor boy, he does not realise he is so ill, and it would be unkind on my part if I did not tell you that our hopes for his recovery are not very great.My deepest sympathy goes out to you, and I save my prayers to comfort your son in his great weakness. I will write again tomorrow. Yours Sincerely, Rev. JOHN A PATTEN". (Harold Rowe is buried in the Lillers Communal Cemetery). CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE GRAVE OF HAROLD ROWE.

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter Saturday 30th June 1917.

POPULAR WITH ALL RANKS.

Ashton Territorial Killed Instantly By a Shell.

Mrs. Walker of 115 Hulme St. Hurst, has received official information that her son Pte. 352715 JOHN WALKER of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment was killed in action on the 11th. Pte. WALKER was 22 years of age. He joined the army about two years ago and had been out in France about four months. Previous to joining the army, he was apprenticed to Mr HERBERT as a painter and decorator. He was connected with the St James' Sunday School, and was an active member of the cricket and football clubs associated with that school. His father, JAMES WALKER, who died about eighteen months ago, was formerly connected to the Ashton Territorials.

Captain H.V.SAMPSON of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment writes: - "Private WALKER was killed by a shell on the morning of the 11th June, death was instantaneous. Private WALKER had been in this Company for some considerable time, and was very popular with all ranks. He was a very efficient soldier, and always did his duty willingly and well". (John Walker is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery). CLICK HERE TO VIEW JOHN WALKER'S GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 30th June 1917.

FATHER AND SON KILLED.

Father at Munitions Works Disaster and Son at the Front.

A double misfortune has visited Mrs, ALLEN and her family, who reside at 143, Charles St. Ashton. In the terrible munitions works explosion the husband and father, Mr. THOMAS HENRY ALLEN  was instantly killed, and two days later news was received that a son, Pte. 350838 WILLIAM ALLEN of "B" Company, 2/9th Manchester Regiment, had been killed in action. Pte. ALLEN was 22 years of age, and formerly was employed at the New Moss Colliery. He joined the Army as a volunteer in September 1914. Captain SAMPSON, in a letter to Mrs ALLEN, stated that Pte. ALLEN was killed by a shell, along with four others on June 1st. "He was an excellent soldier, brave and obedient, and was very well liked by the officers and men of his Company". A brother, Corporal GEORGE ALLEN, is also in the 2/9th Manchester Regiment.  (William H Allen is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery).CLICK HERE TO VIEW WILLIAM ALLEN'S GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

  

 

Published in the Reporter 7th July 1917.

MILITARY MEDAL.

DUKINFIELD SOLDIER'S HONOUR.

ASHTON TERRITORIAL.

Pte. A HOLDEN, son of Mr & Mrs HARRY HOLDEN of 72, Furnace Street, Dukinfield, has been awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded men on three occasions during August 26th from "No Man's Land" under hostile gunfire. Pte. HOLDEN had been in the Ashton Territorials for eight years prior to the war, but on the outbreak of war he volunteered for active service. He has been in France for about two years.Writing home on June 29th  to his parents, he said "I am very pleased to tell you that I have won the Military Medal with a special bar attached to it for gallantry in the field".The gallant soldier is 27 years of age, and in civil life was employed as a miner at Bradford Colliery, near Manchester.  Two brothers are also in the Army, Pte. FRED HOLDEN 1/9th(?), at present in a convalescent hospital, and Pte. CLIFFORD HOLDEN 1/? Manchester Regiment, now in France and formerly an employee at Texas Mill. 

 

  

Published in the Reporter 7th July 1917.

ASHTON SOLDIER KILLED IN ACTION IN FRANCE.

Mr. James Harrop, herbalist, Old Street, Ashton, has received official news that his brother, Private SAM HARROP, of the 3/9th Manchester Regiment, was killed in France on June 22nd. He joined the Army under Lord Derby's group scheme, going out to France last March. Prior to enlisting he was employed at Newton Moor Spinning Co. as a joiner. He was a member of the Ashton P.S.A. Society, and is on their Roll of Honour. He was also an Ashton Buffalo. The sad news was first conveyed by Lieutenant NICHOLSON, who described Private HARROP as one of the most promising men in the platoon, and that he was very popular throughout the whole Company.

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter

 7th July 1917.

BRAVE WATERLOO YOUTH.

The story which attaches to the death of Corporal 350351 JOSEPH WILDE, 1/9th Manchester Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wilde, of 10, Langham Street, Waterloo, constitutes an illuminating episode of bravery and devotion to duty, even unto death. This young soldier, who would have been 20 years of age on the 17th of this month, was killed on the 2nd June, according to the official news received at the latter end of last week, and yet, though so young, he was spoken about by his officers as one of the bravest and best non commissioned officers.

In Gallipoli and France he brought in wounded men under fire. In France a few days before he himself was killed he brought in a wounded soldier, Private FIELDING, from 300 yards in advance of his own position. The Private died, and Corporal WILDE was buried beside him. Corporal WILDE'S own brother helped to dig his grave, and he was buried next to a Lance-Corporal who went to fetch him in. Such is the story of his death, told more fully and with a high appreciation of his worth in  letters which his parents have received from Captain F.W.KERSHAW and Second Lieutenant ALFRED GRAY. Captain KERSHAW wrote: - "I cannot too highly praise your son. He was a fine lad, and a splendid example of Lancashire pluck and grit. He was much thought of and respected in the Company of his battalion. He did excellent work whilst in the Gallipoli Peninsula, and also whilst in France. Only a few days ago Lieutenant MARSDEN and Private FIELDING were hit out in front of our lines, and your son volunteered to go out and assist in bringing them in. He carried Private FIELDING back to our trenches, a distance of 300 yards, on his back. On two occasions in Gallipoli he also assisted in bringing in wounded under fire. He was a keen, capable, and very courageous non commissioned officer, and is greatly missed by officers and men of his Company on whose behalf I beg to extend to you our deepest sympathy at your terrible loss. Your son was brought in from the advanced trenches by some of his comrades. He was buried with fitting ceremony in a British soldiers cemetery, near to Lieutenant MARSDEN, Private FIELDING, and Private ASHCROFT, who were killed about the same time." Corporal WILDE was the eldest of a family of nine children and had been a member of the Ashton Territorials from the time they left England for Egypt. He had been slightly wounded in the face whilst at Gallipoli, and was evacuated back to Egypt, and from there was sent to France. He was previously employed as a piecer at the Rock Mill, Waterloo, Ashton. (Joseph Wilde is buried in the Neuville-Bourjonval British Cemetery).

 

 

 

 

 Published in the Reporter 7th July 1917.

KILLED BY SHELL 

 Ashton Territorial Who Re-joined When War Broke Out.

Mr. and Mrs. Hall, of 27, Bradgate Street, Ashton, have received the sad intelligence that their only son, Lance-Corporal 39649 J. HALL, of the 1/9th battalion, Manchester Regiment, was killed in action on April 11th. Lance-Corporal HALL joined the Ashton Territorials some years ago, and served about four years. On the outbreak of the war he re-joined, and went through the Dardanelles campaign, and did good service in Egypt. Under the direction of Major CONNERY, he qualified for the Machine Gun Section of the battalion, serving in the 126th Coy. He had been in France since February 1917. Previous to joining the army he worked at the New Moss Colliery as a winch winder. Mr. and Mrs Hall have received several letters from officers and men of the battalion expressing their deep sympathy. Major KIRKPATRICK wrote: - "Lance Corporal HALL was killed on April 11th, about 3.30pm, by a piece of shell hitting him in the neck. He died in a few minutes and was unconscious. He was a hard worker, and one of my best men, and will be a sad loss to us all." (J. Hall is buried in the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery).

 

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 7th July 1917.

TERRITORIAL GASSED.

Ashton Man's Death During Big Attack On Germans.

Mrs. R. Chadderton, of 43, Cotton Street, Ashton, has received official news that her husband, Private 350802 RICHARD CHADDERTON, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, died from the effects of gas poisoning on June 13th. He had been in the army about three years, and had been in France since January this year, and was attached to the Machine Gun Section. Previous to joining the army he was employed as a collier at the Snipe Pit, where he had worked since he was 13 years of age. He leaves a widow and two young children. His eldest daughter was accidentally killed about two years ago on Odlham Road by a motorcar. He has a brother, Corporal ALBERT CHADDERTON, who is with 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. He was a member of the Ashton Territorials, and was formerly stage manager at the Empire Hippodrome, Ashton. Private FRANK BURKE has written to Mrs. Chadderton stating - "Poor DICK met his death on Wednesday, June 13th. We had been hammering the Germans pretty badly for a few days before, and that morning they sent gas over and your poor husband had the misfortune to get some of it, with the result that he died shortly afterwards. He was a fine soldier, and was well liked by all the officers and N.C.O.'s and men in his Company." (Private RICHARD CHADDERTON is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery).CLICK HERE TO VIEW RICHARD CHADDERTON'S GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

 

 

Published in the Reporter July 14th 1917. 

KILLED BY SHELL.

We regret to record the death in France of a former "Reporter" employee, Private 352313 STANLEY BUCKLEY, of the 1/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment (Ashton Territorials), son of Mr & Mrs Samuel Buckley, of Rose Mount, Littlemoss. Private BUCKLEY, according to his comrades, was killed in action on July 3rd.

Pte. JOHN BATTY, a chum of Pte. BUCKLEY, whose home is in Birch Street, Ashton, wrote " I am sorry to inform you that your son Stanley was killed between 12 and 1am this morning. I don't know if Stanley ever mentioned me in his letters, but during our training out in Egypt and here we have stuck to each other like brothers.  I, along with Stanley and a party, were warned off to do some wire laying in the front of the trench, when the enemy shelled our trench with their trench mortar. I am proud to tell you he met his death with a smile on his face, and that he in every way proved himself a true type of soldier and a pal."  Pte. BUCKLEY would have been 29 years of age next Tuesday. He was a machineman at the "Reporter Office" where he served his apprenticeship, and was a popular and genial member of the staff. He joined the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment in March 1916, and was later drafted to the 1/9th Battalion in Egypt, and later arrived in France. He attended the Taunton Sunday Schools, and was a member of the Waterloo and Taunton Liberal Club. The flag was hoisted half-mast at the club on the sad news being brought to the notice of the members. He is the first member of the Ashton Branch of the Typographical Society to fall in action. Two brothers are also in the forces, Pte. WILLY BUCKLEY is serving with the Royal Engineers in France, and Pte. SAMUEL BUCKLEY is at Whitchurch. (Stanley Buckley is buried in the Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery).

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Published in the Reporter Saturday 21st July 1917.

HURST SOLDIER KILLED.

Mr. Hodgin, now of Middleton Junction, but formerly residing in Stanhope Road, Hurst, has received official news that his only son, Pte. 352870 HAROLD HODGIN of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment has been killed in action. He was 22 years of age, and joined the army in September 1914. He was formerly employed as a piecer at the Curzon Mill. A letter from Pte. JACK COLDICUT states that HAROLD HODGIN was killed on the 12th June. He was always cheery and bright under all conditions, and was a good soldier and a true pal. (Harold Hodgin is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery).CLICK HERE TO VIEW HAROLD HODGIN'S GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 21st July 1917.

DUKINFIELD CORPORAL KILLED.

Rejoined Ashton Territorials When the War Broke Out.

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Spurrett, 192, Park Road, Dukinfield, have received official notice from the military authorities that their son, Corporal 350520 ARTHUR SPURRETT,  "A" Company of the 1/9th Battalion Manchester Regt. was killed in action on June 26th 1917. He was 26 years of age. He had had previous training with the Ashton Territorials, and rejoined them in September 1914. He went through the Dardanelles campaign, where he was placed in charge of the machine gun section. He was afterwards laid up in hospital for some time with scalp wounds. He was also wounded while in Egypt. On recovering he came over for a short leave in April, and returned to France at the beginning of this year.  Previous to joining the army he was employed at the Sands Vale Print Works. As a youth he attended St. John's Day School, Dukinfield, and was also connected with the United Methodist Sunday School, Tame Valley. His youngest brother, Private THURSTON SPURRETT is in the 3/9th Manchester Regiment, and is at present in France. Previous to joining the army he was employed as a piecer at Messrs. Chadwick's, Tame Valley Mill. Another brother, Private HERBERT SPURRETT, aged 23 years, is at present training at Cleethorpes. He was employed as a 2nd man on the G.C. Railway before joining the army. Major HOWARTH, in a letter to the parents, states that Corporal SPURRETT and Lance Corporal BARKER went over the top on ??? patrol. They achieved their objective as far as it was possible, and were returning when Corporal SPURRETT was hit. He just spoke to his companion when he was again hit, and he breathed his last. (Arthur Spurrett is buried in Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery).

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