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THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.
THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT
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THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT             

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT

1917 PAGE 5

 

THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT.

 

1917 -  FRANCE & BELGIUM.

 

 

Published in the Reporter 27th October 1917.

ASHTON TERRITORIAL.

Killed After Being in Firing Line Only a Fortnight. 

A letter which has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Lees, confectioners of Stamford Square, Cockbrook, Ashton, conveys the sad intelligence that their son, Private 352070 JAMES MOSS LEES, Manchester Regiment, has been killed in action. The communication, dated October 13th, is from one of his comrades, Private J. FLEMING, who says: - "Your son was one of my very best chums, and we promised each other that should anything befall either of us we would let their parents know. I feel his loss very much, and it will be a very hard blow to bear, so please accept my greatest sympathy in the loss of such a good son and good soldier." Private LEES was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Lees, and would have been 22 years of age tomorrow (Sunday). He enlisted in the Ashton Territorials about two years ago, and until about three months ago he was on the clerical staffs at various camps in England. He was then sent with a draft to France, and it was only a fortnight before his death that he went up to the firing line in Flanders. (James Moss Lees is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

  

Published in the Reporter 27th October 1917.

SHOT BY SNIPER

Hurst Corporal Who Was in the Advance at Ypres.

"We were advancing at Ypres, on the 10th inst. Corporal  W. BARDSLEY received a wound, and was making his way to the impromptu dressing station on the field, when he was shot through the head by a sniper," writes Private H. HAIGH, of the 2/9th, referring to the death of Corporal 352651 WILLIAM BARDSLEY, of the same regiment, whose home is at 14, Ladbrooke Road, Hurst. His wife, Mrs. W. Bardsley, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Bardsley, with whom she resides, received the sad news last week. Sergeant FRANK DICKINSON, one of the 2/9th also writes: -"It is with deep regret that I write to inform you of the death of your husband. He was killed in action by an enemy sniper and died instantly, but perhaps it may be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain. I can assure you that you have the deep sympathy of everyone who remains in the Company. He was one of the most promising N.C.O.'s, and will be missed by all." Corporal W. BARDSLEY had been 17 months in the army, and had been in France about seven months. He was 25 years of age, and prior to joining the army had worked as a wages clerk. Four years ago he married Miss Emma Marsh. (Corporal William Bardsley is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 27th October 1917.

 

VALUABLE WORK.

A Hooley Hill Soldier's Bravery.

 

During an attack on an enemy blockhouse east of xxxx on the night of 11th-12th September, Pte FRANK WHITE, C126, was one of the Lewis Gun section of the right platoon, and did valuable work in reconnoitring the ground for the advance of his section. When the centre platoon was held up by machine gun fire Pte. WHITE volunteered to go over from the right to ascertain what was happening, and subsequently returned under a considerable fire from machine guns, rifle grenades and trench mortars, and reported the position of affairs to his platoon commander. He showed coolness and disregard of danger throughout. Such is the official record of the deed which Pte. FRANK WHITE, 1/9th Manchesters, of 3, Tame Street, Hooley Hill, has been awarded the Military Medal. Joining up in November 1914, Pte. WHITE trained at Southport for some time and afterwards went through the Dardanelles campaign, and has now been in France since March of this year. In civil life he worked at the L and N.W. Railway Co. Oldham Road, Ashton, as a goods porter. Two other brothers are serving - TOM WHITE, 2/9th Manchester Regiment in France, and JAMES WHITE, 8th Manchester Regiment, at present stationed at Filey, he too having been in the Dardanelles.

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 3rd November 1917.

   AWARDED D.C.M.

On Monday the Mayor of Dukinfield (Mrs Kenyon) received the following telegraphic message from France: - "The Mayoress of Dukinfield, CSM, F.DICKINSON, of the battalion, at present on leave in your town, has been awarded the D.C.M. for gallantry in action on 9th, 10th and 17th October, 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment".

Company Sergeant Major FRANK DICKINSON resides on Zetland Street, Dukinfield, and up to Wednesday of this week he was over on short furlough. He has been in military service since October 1914, when he joined the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment in Ashton-Under-Lyne. He was called out to France with the 66th Division on the 14th February 1917. He has been in the trenches 32 days at a stretch. They marched for 11 hours to reach the battle front. His battalion went into action, and in No Mans Land DICKINSON found himself along with a Lewis gunner named LORD BARKER, of Alma Street, Dukinfield. They took one pill box. When the Germans saw there were only two of them with a Lewis gun jammed, and DICKINSON with only a rifle, a German officer came forward and demanded their surrender. DICKINSON shot him dead.  Another German ran to the officers assistance, and he was bagged as well. DICKINSON and BARKER sheltered in a shell hole for 44 hours before a field party could get to them. DICKINSON said that BARKER deserved the D.C.M. and also others of the battalion who all showed conspicuous bravery on that occasion.

  

  

Published in the Reporter 3rd November 1917.

SIX IN THE ARMY - ONE KILLED AND ANOTHER WOUNDED.

 Mr. & Mrs ALFRED BROADHURST, of 115 Moss Street, Ashton, have received information from the military authorities that their son, Pte. 351671 TOM BROADHURST, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, died on October 12th, from wounds received in action. He was hit with a piece of shrapnel in the leg, and after being conveyed to the clearing station died about four hours afterwards. He joined the forces in June 1915, and has been out in France since March this year. He has three brothers in the army, Pte. JOE BROADHURST, in the  Coldstream Guards, Pte. HAROLD BROADHURST and Pte. ALBERT BROADHURST, in the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, and his two half-brothers are also in the army, Pte. TOM CHADWICK, in the 3/9th, and Pte. WRIGHT CHADWICK is in the 16th Cheshire Regiment. Pte. ALBERT BROADHURST is at present in hospital suffering from a fractured knee. He was on board the troopship which was torpedoed in the Mediterranean in January, and was rescued along with a few comrades from a small boat in which they put to sea. (Tom Broadhurst is buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery).Click HERE to view the grave.  

  

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 3rd November 1917.

 WIDOW'S ONLY SON KILLED.

Waterloo Soldier's Death Reported by Comrade.

Especially sad circumstances are associated with the death in action of Pte. 351761 JOHN HEALEY, 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, of 13, Ney Street, Waterloo, Ashton, whose mother has received information from a comrade that he was killed instantly by a shell on October 9th. Mrs Healey is a widow and by her soldier son's death she has now lost the last of her children. A daughter has passed away since the war began.  Prior to joining the army, Pte. HEALEY had worked at the Snipe Pit. He was however, a roller turner by trade and served his apprenticeship at Park Bridge. He was 26 years of age and was a single man, and the only person his widowed mother had to depend on. He was a dedicated follower of the Waterloo F.C. He joined the army in April 1915, and had been serving in France & Belgium since February of this year. (John Healey is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery).Click HERE to view the grave. 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 3rd November 1917.

HURST SOLDIER MISSING.

Enquiring the fate Pte. 350897 HAROLD DUNKERLEY, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Walter Dunkerley of 25, Smallshaw Lane, Hurst, and if any of our soldier readers in Flanders can give his parents any definite information, it will be gratefully received. Pte. DUNKERLEY is in the Lewis Gun Section, and was in "D" Company. One report states that he is missing since October 10th, and another is that he is a prisoner of war.

Pte. DUNKERLEY is 23 years of age. Before joining the 2nd 9th Battalion he was assistant secretary at the Atlas Mill. He was a bright, cheery youth, and it will afford relief to his many friends if some satisfactory statement is forthcoming regarding him. (Pte. Harold Dunkerley was never found. He is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

    

Published in the Reporter 3rd November 1917.

HURST SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Official news has been received by Mrs E. SLATER, of 10, Ladbrooke Road, that her son, Pte. JOHN SLATER, of the 2/9th Manchesters, is at Boulougne, suffering from severe gunshot wounds in the right leg. Pte. SLATER has also written to say that he has just been marked for "Blighty", suffering from a fractured femur and severe gunshot wounds in the right knee. He is reported to be making satisfactory progress.

 

 

  

 Published in the Reporter 3rd November 1917.

HURST SOLDIER KILLED.

Official news has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Coles, who reside at 142, Hope Street, Hurst, that their son, Lance Corporal 352109 ARTHUR THOMAS COLES, of the 2/9th Manchesters, Lewis Machine Gun Section, had been killed in action on October 9th. Lance-Corporal COLES, who was well known in the district of Hurst, was 22 years of age, and after being rejected on three occasions, he attested under the Lord Derby scheme, and ultimately joined up on January 20th, 1916, proceeding to France in March of the present year. Lance-Corporal COLES was connected with St. John's Sunday School as a teacher, and was also a member of the church choir. He also acted as secretary to the Hurst Amateur Football Club, and was employed at Brushes Ltd., in Warre Street, Ashton. His death has cut off a most promising future career as he had secured the following honours at the Heginbottom Technical School: Arithmetic, junior grade 1914, senior grade, 1915, whilst in 1914 he also passed the junior grade test for bookkeeping, and a preliminary examination for shorthand in the session previous. He also secured a scholarship for two sessions 1913-14 and 1914-15, for winning three grades. His brother, Private LESLIE COLES, is with the 3rd Manchesters. The loss of such a promising son has been a big blow to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Coles, and much sympathy will be extended to them in their sad loss. (Arthur T. Coles is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery).Click HERE to view Arthur Coles grave. 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

    AWARDED D.C.M.

ASHTON REGIMENTAL SERGEANT MAJOR

   ONE OF THE 1/9TH

The Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in "No Mans Land" on October 9th has been awarded to Regt. Sergt. Major J.W. PEAGRAM of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment (Ashton Territorials).

Regt. Sergt. Major PEAGRAM joined the 2/9th Manchesters on November 7th 1914, as a Private, at the age of 20. He was made Lance Corporal on February 18th 1915, Lance-Sergeant December 4th 1915, Sergeant February 1916. He passed the examination at Bisley as a first class musketry instructor and was made C.S.M. on October 20th 1916. He was made R.S.M on August 25th 1917 while serving in France, after competition with other N.C.O's. He received the D.C.M on October 20th 1917. His father, Mr G.L. PEAGRAM is foreman of the Ashton Corporation Highways Department, and previous to joining the colours, Regt. Sergt. Major J.W. PEAGRAM was apprentice mason (?) in the same department. He is the first local Corporation employee to be honoured.

  

 

 

Published on the Reporter 10th November 1917.

 TERRITORIAL KILLED

Ashton Sunday School Teacher, Footballer and Cricketer.

Mr and Mrs Richard H. Brooks, of 74, Turner Lane, Ashton, have received official news that their son, Lance Sergeant 351333 HARVEY BROOKS, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was killed in action in France on October 9th. Lance Sergeant BROOKS joined the 3/9th on May 19th 1915, and transferred to the 2/9th on June 19th 1915. He was attached to "A" Coy. He went to France in February of this year. Mr and Mrs Brooks received letters from his Company Sergeant Major, V. DYSON, and Sergeant HEMSHALL(?), telling them of his death, and stating that he was very well liked by all the men, and he died doing his duty.  Lance Sergeant BROOKS was a Sunday school teacher at the Alexandra Road School. He was a very good footballer and cricketer. Prior to enlisting, he was a fitter at the Broadstone mill, Reddish, working for his father. (Harvey Brooks is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

   

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

TERRITORIAL KILLED.

Ashton Soldier Who Was Well Liked by His Comrades.

Mr and Mrs Edwin Johnson, of 80, Oldham Road, Ashton, have received official news of the death in action in France on the 9th October, of their oldest son, Pte. 351333 HARRY JOHNSON, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchesters. (A Company). Pte. JOHNSON joined up in November 1914, and had been in France since February. He had formerly been employed at the Atlas mill. He was connected with Gatefield Sunday school, and is on the Roll of Honour there. Pte. JOHNSON was well liked by his soldier comrades, and sympathy goes out to his family in the sad loss they have sustained. He was 21 years of age. Mr and Mrs Johnson have received a letter written on behalf of his pals of the 2/9th Manchesters, deploring the loss of so worthy a comrade and so promising son. Pte. JOHNSON has two brothers serving - Ernest Johnson is in France, with the 1st Borderers, and Noah Johnson is in the Royal Navy. (Harry Johnson is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

WATERLOO SOLDIER KILLED.

   Mr. John Moore, of 360, Oldham Road, Ashton, has received official notification from the military authorities that his son, Private 352123 JOHN MOORE, of the 2/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment was killed in action on October 9th, 1917. Private HAROLD DEAN, another Waterloo lad, and one of his chums, writes to say that Private MOORE was killed while doing his bit for his King and country. He says that he suffered no pain whatever. Private MOORE joined the army about two years ago and had been in France about eight months. He was 21 years of age. (John Moore is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery). Click HERE to view the grave. .

  

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

HURST BROOK SOLDIER.

Comrades Report Territorial Killed in Action.

Mrs. Moore, who resides at 17, Oldham Street, Hurst Brook, has received two or three letters from comrades stating that her son, Private 351696 JOHN HERBERT MOORE, 1/9th Manchesters, Lewis Machine Gun Section, had been killed on October 24th. Private MOORE was 21 years of age, and worked prior to his joining the Army in June 1915, at the Curzon Mill, Hurst. A further letter has now been received from Platoon Sergeant GEORGE WALKER, who confirms his death. Sergeant WALKER writes: "Dear Mrs. Moore, Your son, Private JOHN H MOORE, was killed in action on the 24th October, and he made the supreme sacrifice in the same spirit he had always shown whilst with us. He was killed instantly by a piece of shell. He died with a smile on his face, and I think he is happy. He was respected by all his comrades with whom he came in touch, and he never grumbled, and always did his best to keep them cheerful. His comrades feel his loss, and when you think of him, think that it was Gods will that he should be taken away to grace the home above which Christ has prepared. Your cross will be all the greater by JACK being the eldest son at home. His country has lost a very good man, a boy in years, but a hero and a man at heart." (John H Moore is buried in Coxyde Military Cemetery). Click HERE to view the grave. 

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

LOSS FELT BY ALL.

Ashton Territorial Killed.

Mr. and Mrs. Bourne, who reside at 35, Princess Street, Ashton, have received a letter from the platoon sergeant informing them that their son, Private 351732 WILLIAM BOURNE, had been killed in action on the 24th October. Private BOURNE, who was 21 years of age, was attached to the 1/9th Manchesters, Lewis Machine Gun Section, and joined the army in April 1915. He was connected with the Hurst Wesleyan Church and also the Ashton P.S.A. He was also a player with Hurst Amateur Football Club, and in civil life was employed at the Stamford Commercial, Hurst. The letter states that Private BOURNE'S loss would be felt by all his comrades. Private Bourne was recently over on furlough, and only went back to France on September 8th, a month before he met his death. (William Bourne is buried in Coxyde Military Cemetery).

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

SHOT BY SNIPER.

Ashton Territorial Killed and Brother Wounded.

Official news has been received by Mr. and Mrs. John Wild, of 53, Turner Street, Ashton, that their son, Private 352144 LEONARD WILD, of the 2/9th Batt. Manchester Regt. (T.F.) was killed in action on October 9th. Lance-Corporal T. WOLSTENHOLME, in expressing the sympathy of the men with Mr. and Mrs. Wild, states that Private WILD was shot by a sniper. Two days later, a brother, Private EDWARD WILD, who was serving in the same battalion, was wounded for the second time, sustaining severe injuries to the right thigh. He is now in hospital in Edinburgh. Private LEONARD WILD was 21 years of age. He was educated at Christ Church Day Schools, and attended the Alexandra Road U.M. Sunday School. Before joining the second line of the Ashton Territorials in June 1916, he was a twiner-minder at the Park Bridge Spinning Co. (Leonard Wild is listed on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

  

 

Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

ONE OF THE MOST POPULAR MEN IN THE COMPANY.

Mrs. Hague, of 10, Tipping Place, Queen Street, Dukinfield has received official information that her husband, Lance-Corporal 351020 EDWARD HAGUE, had been killed in action on 9th October. Proceeding this a letter had been received from one of his comrades, Private J. COLLINS, who writes: "Dear Mrs. Hague, It is my desire and the desire of my comrades of No. 11 platoon and throughout the company to convey to you our sincere sympathy at the loss of your husband. He was one of the most popular men in our company. A good sport and a good fellow, with a laugh always to cheer us up. He was killed instantly whilst using his gun, and suffered no pain and died facing the foe." Lance-Corporal HAGUE joined the 2/9th Manchester Regiment in September 1914. He is the second son of Mr. George Henry Hague, of Nelson Street, Hurst, killed in action, the other son being Private 6363 JOSEPH HAGUE, of the Oxford and Bucks,(Machine Gun Corps, 52nd Coy) who fell at Ypres on February 17th 1916, aged 28. Another son, Private THOMAS HAGUE, is with the King's Royal Rifles, and has been in France since July 1915. (Edward Hague is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery. His brother, Joseph Hague, is listed on the Ypres Menin Gate Memorial to the missing).CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE GRAVE.

  

 

 Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

A HURST LANCE CORPORAL KILLED.

Lance-Corporal 351214 JOHN PAYNE, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, and of Chamber Hill Cottage, late of Queens Street, Hurst, was killed in action on October 9th, on the Belgium front. He was 23 years of age, and was a scholar at St John's Day and Sunday School. He also worked at the Curzon Mill. (John Payne is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery).

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Published in the Reporter 10th November 1917.

AN ASHTON SERGT. KILLED.

Sunday School Teacher and Secretary for Several Years.

Lance-Sergeant 351196 FRED LEE, 2/9th Manchester Regiment, late of Harris Street, Ashton, who has fought on the Belgium fronts, is officially reported to have been killed in action. News reached his wife from the War office on Friday week that his death occurred on October 9th. A letter sent by his sergeant-major states that the N.C.O.'s and men of C Company "loved him like a brother." Lance-Sergeant FRED LEE was 32 years of age, and leaves a widow. He was a native of Stalybridge, and worked for Messrs. John Chadwick and Sons, Tame Valley Mills, Dukinfield, for upwards of 20 years as a piecer and minder. He was connected with the Tame Valley Sunday School for 22 years, and was a teacher from October 1904 till 1911, and the secretary from 1911 until he joined the army in October 1914. (Fred Lee is listed on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 17th November 1917.

 TERRITORIAL KILLED.

Information has been received from the Records Office, Preston, by Mrs HIPWELL, of 11. Northcote Street, Ashton, to the effect that her son, Pte. 350730 ALFRED HIPWELL, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment has been killed in action in France.

Pte. HIPWELL was 23 years of age, and enlisted in September 1914, having been out in France ten months. Whilst in training at Colchester he won a gold medal and 30 shillings for shooting. In civil life Pte. HIPWELL was employed as a spinner at Messrs. Heginbottom's Junction Mills.

(Alfred Hipwell is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery).      

 

  
 
 
 
 

Published in the Reporter 17th November 1917

TERRITORIAL WHO WAS SEEN TO FALL APPARENTLY WOUNDED.

Official news has been received by Mr & Mrs EATON, 55, Wellington Road, Ashton, that their only son, Pte. 352139 ARTHUR EATON of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was reported missing on the 9th October. From a letter received from one of his chums, it is presumed he has been killed. The Company were making an attack and he was seen to fall apparently wounded about the same time that the late Pte. 352161  WALTER G. SALTER was fatally wounded. Pte. SALTER'S body was recovered, but no trace could be found of Pte. EATON, and nothing further has been heard of him. He was 22 years of age, and prior to enlisting he was cashier at the Aegis Clothing Co. Manchester. He joined the army about two years ago, and had been in France eight months.

(Arthur Eaton is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

   

Published in the Reporter 17th November 1917.

BEGGED TO GO OVER.

Ashton Territorial Missing After Big Attack.

"He begged to go over with the rest of the men, although he was detailed to remain behind, and it was not until the last moment that consent was given for him to go" - wrote C.S.Major Hynes in conveying to Mr. and Mrs. John Walker, of 15, Rockridge Street, Ashton, the sad news that little hope should be entertained of their son, Corporal 1370 JOSEPH WALKER, of the 2/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment, being alive. Although the official report states that Corporal JOSEPH WALKER was missing, C.S.M. HYMES wrote that he was badly wounded during the big attack in which his battalion recently took part, and that he was last seen in a shell hole, nothing further has been heard of him. He was regarded as one of the best N.C.O.'S the 2/9th had taken out. Corporal WALKER was 26 years of age. He worked in the bottling department of the Ashton District Mineral Bottling Company. Three years ago he enlisted in the second line of Ashton Territorials. His brothers, William and John Walker, and his brother-in-law are also serving. (Corporal Joseph Walker died on 9.10.1917 and is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 17th November 1917.

TERRITORIAL KILLED.

Ashton Man Shot By Sniper and Comrade Wounded.

Mrs. Harlock, 25, Wilde Street, Ashton, has received official news that her husband, Private 350781 JOHN WILLIAM HARLOCK, was killed by a sniper on October 9th. He joined the army three years ago, and had been in France since March this year. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Jas. Howe and Co, Ltd, wastedealers, Turner Lane, Ashton, and leaves a widow and child and also a mother, who has been an invalid for some years. His brother, Private THOMAS HARLOCK, died in the Dardanelles two years ago from enteric fever. Lieutenant H.W.HALL, writing to the widow, states that Private HARLOCK was a good soldier, and his loss was greatly felt by the company, with all of whom he was very popular. Private FRED MACHENT also sent a sympathetic letter and mentioned that he was by Private HARLOCK'S side when he was shot, and that he himself was wounded at the same time. (John William Harlock is listed on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 17th November 1917.

WATERLOO MAN KILLED.

Always Ready, Willing, Cheerful, and Trustworthy.

Private 350869 WALTER LEECH, 1/9th Manchester Regiment, is reported to have died of wounds in France.

  Private LEECH was the eldest son of the late Mr. Ralph Leech, of 35, Oaken Clough, Waterloo. He was 23 years of age, and had been in the army since September 1914. He was with "A" Company when they went to the Dardanelles, and there suffered from dysentery. He returned to France on October 23rd, and on Tuesday of this week a letter came to Mrs. Sarah E. Leech announcing his death on November 8th. The communication, dated November (illegible) came from Major T.E.HOWARTH - "About noon today as he was passing down the trench an enemy shell exploded near him and a fragment struck him on the head piercing his helmet. He passed away about an hour afterwards without having regained consciousness. I am extremely sorry for your loss. All his friends in this great battalion have lost a good comrade, and I shall also miss him. He was a willing and cheerful and keen comrade and soldier, and a boy in whom I could absolutely trust." (Walter Leech is buried in the Coxyde Military Cemetery). Click on the ICON to view Walter's grave. Click BACK in your browser to return to this website. 

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