THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT

1917 PAGE 6

 

THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT.

 

1917 -  FRANCE & BELGIUM.

 

 

Published in the Reporter 24th November 1917.

KILLED ON HIS BIRTHDAY.

DUKINFIELD SOLDIER WHO HAD ONLY BEEN OUT EIGHT MONTHS.

Official news has been received by Mrs. CHADDERTON, of 7. St. Johns Street, Dukinfield, that her son, Pte. 350870 ALBERT CHADDERTON, of "A" Coy, 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, has been killed in action in France, on the 9th of October, his 24th birthday.

He joined the army soon after the outbreak of war, and had only been in France eight months. He was connected with St. Matthew's Church, Stalybridge, and previous to the war he was employed at the Ray Mill, Stalybridge.  A letter received by Mrs. CHADDERTON from her son's officer stated that he saw Pte. CHADDERTON wounded and placed on a stretcher to be taken down to the hospital. (Albert Chadderton is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 24th November 1917.

DUKINFIELD SOLDIER KILLED.

Official notification has been received of the death of Lance Corporal  351020 EDWARD HAGUE, whose home was 10, Tippings Place (Off Queens St.) Dukinfield. The notice states that he had been killed in action on October 9th. He was 25 years of age, and leaves a widow. Pte. HAGUE was formerly employed at Park Bridge Ironworks, and joined the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. He went to France several months ago. (Edward Hague is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery).

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 24th November 1917.

ASHTON SOLDIERS FATE.

Mrs. Emily Burke, of 22, Gas Street, Ashton, has received information that her son, Pte. 350888 HARRY BURKE, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, has been reported missing since October 9th. Sergeant Major DICKINSON, from whom enquiries have been made, thinks that he was probably killed in action. Pte. BURKE had been in the Army about three years and had been out in France about eight months. He was a member of St. Peter's Men's Class. He is 20 years of age.

His brother, Lance Corporal 1155 WILLIAM BURKE was in the 1/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, and died in hospital in Egypt in July 1915.  (Harry Burke is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

 

 

Published in the Reporter 24th November 1917.

     JOINED WHEN HE WAS 16.

ASHTON TERRITORIAL KILLED.

 An official intimation has been received by Mr and Mrs LEE, of 256, Whitelands Road, Ashton, that their son, Pte. 39709 JOHN LEE, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment (TF) was killed in action on October 27th. Pte. LEE was 18 years of age, and had been in the Ashton Territorials about one year and nine months, joining when he was but 16 years of age. His brother, Pte. JAMES WILLIAM LEE is also serving. (John Lee is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery. - The CWGC website states that Pte. Lee was serving with the 21st Battalion at the time of his death).  Click on the Icon to view John Lee's grave. Click BACK in your browser to return to this website.

  

 

Published in the Reporter 24th November 1917.

ASHTON SOLDIER KILLED.

  Mrs R. WILDE, of 194, Park Street, Ashton, has received information from the military authorities that her husband, Pte. 350717 ROBERT WILDE, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, was killed in action on October 9th. Pte. WILDE joined the army soon after war commenced, and was placed on the arm stores staff at the training camp. He has been out in France about eight months. Prior to enlisting, he was employed as a labourer on the Stamford Estate. He leaves a widow and five children. (Robert Wild is buried in Tyne Cot Cemetery). Click on the Icon to view Robert Wild's grave. Click BACK in your browser to return to this website.

 

   

 

Published in the Reporter 1st December 1917.

     TERRITORIAL MISSING.

Mr and Mrs WILLIAM HULME, of 37, Turner Street, Ashton, have received official notice that their eldest son, Pte. 351820 JOHN HULME, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was reported missing on October 9th.  He joined the Army in May 1915. He has been wounded in his right hand since being out. He is 21 years of age. His brother, Pte. WILLIAM HULME, is also serving in France.

(Pte. JOHN HULME was never found; he is recorded on the Tyne Cot memorial to the missing).

   

 

Published in the Reporter 1st December 1917.

CAR CONDUCTOR KILLED.

Tribute to Hurst Man Who Had Been Promoted.

Mrs. M. Harrison, of 110, Queen Street, Hurst, has received the following letter from Company Sergeant-Major H.B. SMITH, of B Company, 2/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment, "It is with deepest regret that I find it my duty to inform you of your son's death whilst following his devoted duties. It may, perhaps, consloe you to know that his death was instantaneous, he being hit by shrapnel from an enemy shell on the 12th inst. He had been in my company ever since he joined the battalion, and was at all times cheery, and a very willing worker, and a soldier of the best kind. He had recently been promoted, and was a prominent N.C.O. and was well respected by all the officers, N.C.O.'s and men of the company, by whom he was held in high esteem. I beg to offer my deepest sympathy and also that of his comrades in your sad loss." Lance-Corporal 351854 HAROLD HARRISON, who was 30 years of age, was employed by the Ashton Corporation as a conductor. He was a regular attender at Ashton P.S.A. and also Queen Street United Methodists. Lance-Corporal HARRISON joined the army in June 1915, and proceeded to France last March, since which time he had seen much hard fighting on the Ypres front as a member of the Lewis Machine Gun Section. (Harold Harrison died on the 11th November, and was buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery).CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

  

 

Published in the Reporter 8th December 1917.

LOCAL FOOTBALLER KILLED.

 Ashton Territorial Who Had Been Reported Missing.

Exactly a month after receiving official notification of her husband being missing, Mrs F. BROADHURST, who resides at 41, Princess Street, Ashton, received official news that he had been killed in action on October 9th on the western front. Pte. 350841 FRANK BROADHURST was connected with the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, which he joined in October 1914, proceeding to France last March.  He was a member of the St. Peter's Men's Class football team and he had also assisted the Battalion football team as a Goalkeeper.  While out in France he had won a silver medal, his team being the Champions. He was 21 years of age, and prior to joining the Army worked at Guide Bridge Spinning Company. (Frank Broadhurst is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 8th December 1917.

     TERRITORIAL KILLED.

Mrs H. BARRETT, of 1, Burton's Yard, Cross Leech Street, Stalybridge, formerly of Hill Street, Ashton, has now received official information that her husband Pte. 351184 HARRY BARRETT, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment who had been reported missing, was killed in action on October 9th 1917. He was 37 years of age and leaves a widow and two children.

Pte. BARRETT joined the Army in November 1914. Captain E.H. SCOTT wrote, " I am sorry to say that there can be no doubt that your husband was killed by a sniper. I hope that it may be a little consolation to you in your great loss to know that he was killed doing his duty under very difficult and trying conditions". (Harry Barrett is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing). 

   

 

Published in the Reporter 15th December 1917.

TWO ASHTON BROTHERS KILLED.

Mr and Mrs. J.W. Robinson, of 71, Hill Street, Ashton, have received the sad news that their second son, Private 352451 TOM ROBINSON, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, died from wounds on the 22nd November, 1917. In the telegram which they received they learned that he was hit in the neck, head and shoulders by a piece of bursting shell, and that his death took place in hospital. Before joining the army he was a member of the C.V.R at Dukinfield, which he joined when 17 years of age. He joined the army in May 1916, when he was 19 years of age, and was sent to Colchester for training. He was sent out to France in March 1917. Previous to the war he attended the Christ Church (Gatefield) School and worked for Mr. Rogerson, Cavendish Street, for several years. His elder brother, Private 1382 SAM EARNEST ROBINSON, an old Territorial, was mobilised on the outbreak of war, and accompanied the 9th Battalion to Egypt and the Dardanelles, where he was killed. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have two sons-in-law in the service. (Tom Robinson is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, his brother Sam who died 7th June 1915 aged 21, is recorded on the Helles Memorial to the missing).CLICK ON THIS LINK TO VIEW THE GRAVE. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

  

 

 

 Published in the Reporter 15th

December 1917.

JOINED WHEN HE WAS 16.

Ashton Youth Killed the First Time in Action.

Official news has been received at his home, 81a, Cambridge Street, Ashton, that Drummer 351430 ARTHUR GREEN, Manchester Regiment, was killed in action on October 9th. He was 19 years of age. His brother, has received the following letter from his commanding officer: "I am sorry to say that Drummer A. GREEN has been killed in action. He went out with a message, but was not seen again. He was at first reported as missing, but a little while afterwards his body was found. Fate was very hard on him indeed, as it was his first time in action with the battalion. It seems he was killed by a shell on the 9th October. Please accept my deepest sympathy in your great loss." Drummer GREEN was originally in the 3/9th Manchester Regiment, which he joined in January 1915, at the age of 16 years, and went out with the first contingent from Southport to the Dardanelles. While there he contracted enteric fever, and was eventually invalided to England. After failing many medical boards he was marked fit, and drafted out to France. He was connected with Audenshaw St Stephen's Sunday School, and with the Church Lad's Brigade, as a buglar. ( Arthur Green is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

   

 

Published in the Reporter 19th December 1917.

SIGNALLER KILLED.

Dukinfield Youth Who Had Been A Prominent Scout.

News has been officially received that Signaller 350907 HAROLD PERKS was killed instantaneously by a shell on the 28th November. He was the youngest son of the late Mr. W.E.Perks and Mrs. Perks, of 299, Astley Street, Dukinfield, and was 21 years of age. He joined the 2/9th Manchester Regiment in October 1914, and went out to France on the 4th March 1917. Signaller PERKS was brought up at the Dukinfield Hall Day and Sunday School, where he was a great favourite. He was a patrol leader in the Dukinfield Hall Boy Scouts, and in all the movements associated with the Sunday School he was always a cheerful and willing participant. Previous to joining the colours, he was a cork cutter at Messrs. Roberts, Dukinfield. A letter has been received from a comrade, Private STANLEY NORTH, a native of Dukinfield, confirming the manner of Signaller PERKS death, and expressing sympathy of the boys of the Signal  Section. There will be a memorial service at Dukinfield Hall Church next Sunday week, at which it is expected a large number of Boy Scouts from the surrounding district will be present. (Harold Perks is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).CLICK ON THIS LINK TO VIEW THE PANEL. Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 22nd December 1917.

ASHTON CORPORAL KILLED.

Official news has been received by his wife that Corporal 350900 EDWARD MARGERISON, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, had been killed on November 28th. He was 24 years of age. He joined the army over three years ago, and previously worked as an assistant butcher for Mr.A Hulley, Wellington Road, Ashton, and also for the Waterloo Co-operative Society. His wife resides at 12, Frederick Street, Denton. Lieut. BOLDSTOCK, in a letter to Mrs. Margerison, states: "Dear Madam, It is with feelings of deepest regret that I have to inform you of the death of your husband, Corporal Margerison, of my platoon. He was killed on the morning of the 28th of November by a shell. Corporal MARGERISON bore himself well under fire, and set a good example to the men under him. Although I have only been in command of the platoon a few weeks, I shall miss him greatly. Good N.C.O's are scarce, and it will be a long time before I can get another to fill your husbands position as efficiently as he has done. All the officers, N.C.O's and men of the company join with me in an expression of deepest sympathy with you in the time of your great sorrow." (Edward Margerison is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing).

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 22nd December 1917.

HURST SOLDIER KILLED.

Hit by Shell On Returning From Night Duty.

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 Mrs. Clough, 112, Hope Street, Ashton, has received a letter from Corporal 351840 J.HERON, 2/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment, informing her that her husband, Private 351413 JOSHUA CLOUGH, had been killed on November 28th. He had just returned after being on night duty when an enemy shell struck the dug out and he was killed instantly. Corporal HERON  says that Private CLOUGH was a brave soldier, with a keen sense of duty, and one of the best pals in the company. Private CLOUGH, who was 32 years of age, worked at the Gorton Tank up to joining the army in January 1915. He formerly assisted the Victoria Street Mission in the Hooley Hill S.S. League. (Joshua Clough is buried in Dochy Farm New British Cemetery). CLICK HERE TO VIEW JOSHUA'S GRAVE.Click BACK in your browser to return to this page.

  

 

 

Published in the Reporter 29th December 1917.

SEVEN KILLED.

Ashton Territorials Sad Loss in France.

SHELL BURST HAVOC.

 Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Booth, of 10, Cotton Street, Ashton, have received official news that their son, Lance Corporal 351365 JOSEPH BOOTH, 2/9th Manchester Regiment, has been killed in action on November 28th. He was killed by a shell burst, together with six of his comrades. He was 22 years of age, and joined the Territorials in November 1914, prior to which he was an apprentice machine hand for four years at the National Gas Engine Co's Works. He was also formerly connected with Holy Trinity Sunday School and choir, and was a member of the cricket club and the mintrel troupe. Company Sergt-Major F. DICKINSON, D.C.M. has written to Mrs. Booth, "It is with profound and deep regret I write concerning the death of your dear son Joe in action. I cannot find words to assure you of the high esteem in which he was held by all ranks in the company. His heroic conduct and his devotion to duty at all times won for him the admiration of all ranks."  (Joe Booth is buried in Dochy Farm New British Cemetery). Click on the LINK to view Joseph's grave. Click BACK in your browser to return to this website.CLICK HERE TO VIEW JOSEPH BOOTHS GRAVE

  

 

SHELL BURST HAVOC on 28th November 1917.

THE SEVEN KILLED WERE: Pte. 351322 F.THORPE. Pte.351413 J. CLOUGH, Pte.352291 J.W.ETCHELLS, Pte.352610 T.BLEDDYN, L/Cpl. 351365 J.BOOTH, Pte. 352122 C. DEVONPORT and Pte.352904 E.WATKINS. All are buried in Dochy Farm New Cemetery.

 

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