THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS.

THE 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT

1918 PAGE 1

THE ASHTON TERRITORIALS, 9th BATTALION of the MANCHESTER REGIMENT. 

FRANCE - 1918.

 

 

Published in the Reporter 11th May 1918.

TWO ASHTON BROTHERS.

One Missing and Another Gassed.

Private WILLIAM MURPHY, of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, (Ashton Territorials) son of Mr. and Mrs. Murphy, of 12, Hill Street, Dukinfield, has been reported missing after an engagement in France between the dates of March 21st to 31st. Some of his comrades seem to think that he has been taken prisoner, as he has not been heard of since they went into action. He is 23 years of age, and enlisted when the war broke out. He went out with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He formerly worked for Messrs. Buckley, Tame Valley, Dukinfield, and attended the Hill Street Mission, where he assisted in the choir. His older brother, Private EDWARD MURPHY, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, is in hospital in France suffering from the effects of gas poisoning. He has been wounded before, having been accidentally run over by a transport wagon, which broke his leg.

 

  

Published in the Reporter 11th May 1918.

ASHTON MAN MISSING AND BROTHER A PRISONER.

Sergeant 350887 CHARLES ARTHUR TAYLOR, of the 9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, youngest son of Mr. A.J.Taylor, of Bradgate Street, Ashton, has been reported missing after an engagement in France between March 21st and 31st. He joined the army when war broke out in 1914, and has been out in France about 16 months. He was in charge of a machine gun section. He is 26 years of age, and formerly worked for Messrs Wagstaff's in Dukinfield.  His brother, Private JOHN TAYLOR, of the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, machine gun section, has sent a postcard to his wife at 213, Whiteacre Road, informing her that he is a prisoner of war in the German prison camp at Limburg. He enlisted shortly after his brother and went out to France with him. Previous to joining up, he worked at Messrs. Jones Sewing Machine Works, Guidebridge. (Charles Arthur Taylor is recorded on the Pozieres Memorial to the missing. His date of death is given as 21.3.1918).

 

  

Published in the Reporter 11th May 1918.

DUKINFIELD MAN KILLED.

Father Also Serving in a Labour Battalion.

The relatives of Lance Corporal 351073 JOHN WILLIAM WOOD, of 5, Bright Street, Dukinfield, have received the official information that he was killed in action between the dates 21st and 31st of March.

He joined the 9th Battalion, (Ashton Territorials) Manchester Regiment early in 1915. Lance Corporal WOOD was the son of Mr. John W Wood, of 74, Birch Lane, Dukinfield. He was 28 years of age, and prior to enlisting was a piecer at the Wharf Street Mill. He leaves a widow (Annie) and a child. His father is serving in a Labour Battalion. (John William Wood is recorded on the Pozieres Memorial to the missing. His date of death is given as 21.3.1918).

 

 

 

 Published in the Reporter 11th May 1918.

ASHTON SOLDIER AWARDED MILITARY MEDAL.

Private WILLIAM TAYLOR, of the 9th Manchester Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Taylor, of 7, Warre Street, Ashton, has been awarded the Military Medal for bringing wounded men in under heavy shell and machine gun fire. He writes home stating that he has received the congratulations of the commanding officer. He is 23 years of age, and has been in the army four years. He has been serving in France for the last three years. Before joining up he was a minder at the Atlas Spinning Company, Ashton, and he also attended the Charlestown Day and Sunday School. His brothers, Private SAM TAYLOR and Private JOHN TAYLOR, are both serving in the R.F.A.

 

  

 

 Published in the Reporter 18th May 1918.

A   D.C.M. OF THE 9th.

Captured an Enemy Machine Gun.

NOW REPORTED KILLED.

 

 

 Sergeant 350516  FRANK THICKETT, D.C.M. of the 9th Manchester Regiment, of 55, Thornley Square, Denton, son of the late Mr. Joseph Thickett, formerly of Queen Street, Hyde, is reported to have been killed in action in France. His mother, now Mrs. Hadfield, received the official information last week. He had been a soldier of the Ashton Territorials for about eight years, previous to the war.  He volunteered for active service and went with his regiment to Egypt, and took part in the Dardanelles campaign. He was afterwards drafted to France. He was 26 years of age, and was married in November last year to Miss Emily Lomas, of Torkington Street, Stockport, who is a nurse at the Cheadle Royal Hospital. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Peacocks, Gorton. He was awarded the D.C.M. just recently and the following appeared in the "Gazette" dated May 3rd 1918. "D.C.M. (350516) Sergeant F. THICKETT, Manchester Regiment. During a raid in the enemy's trenches, when an enemy machine gun opened fire on the right of the raiding party, he rushed at it with two men, killed the detachment and captured the gun. His prompt and courageous action was of the greatest assistance to the raiding party." (Frank Thickett is recorded on the Pozieres Memorial to the missing. His date of death is given as 21.3.1918).

 

  

 

Published in the reporter 18th May 1918.

IN FRANCE ONLY SIX WEEKS.

Intimation has been received by Mr. and Mrs. E. Mallinson, of 20, Carr St. Hurst, Ashton, that their son, Private 260304 FRANK MALLINSON, of the 13th(S) Battalion King's Liverpool Regiment, and formerly Pte. 3371 and later 357575 of the 9th Battalion, (Ashton Territorials) Manchester Regiment, has died in hospital in France, his death being caused by being gassed. Private MALLINSON was 25 years of age, and he formerly worked as a piecer. He saw service in Gallipoli, and was later drafted out to France. He was invalided home to convalesce after suffering from pneumonia, and went back out to France only six weeks ago. A chaplain of the forces has written to say how Private MALLINSON had died on the 3rd May, and he said how Private MALLINSON had been such an excellent and brave soldier. (Frank Mallinson is buried in the Lapugnoy Military Cemetery).

 

Pte. 3371 FRANK MALLINSON pictured (without cap) with a few of the lads from the 9th Battalion, Ashton Territorials. 

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 18th May 1918.

GALLANT SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHER.

 Another addition to the long list of honours won by the Ashton Territorials is that of the Distinguished Conduct Medal, which has been conferred on Private FRANK ANDREW, of 149, Turner Lane, Ashton. Private ANDREW earned the medal for his gallant conduct during the attack by the Manchester Regiment on B---- when they cleared the place of the enemy, and held it until fresh hordes of the Germans were firing at the town. A war correspondent says "from the first these Lancashire men fought with grim, fierce spirit to hold back the enemy."

 Private ANDREW is 23 years of age. He worked at the Rock Mill, Waterloo, Ashton, and was a teacher at Charlestown Sunday School before he joined the Territorials. He is the son of Mr. Samuel and Elizabeth Andrew of Turner Lane, Ashton.

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 8th June 1918.

WON MILITARY MEDAL.

Ashton Territorial Who Has Been  Wounded.

Private NORMAN SIMISTER, of 4, Alfred Street, Ashton, son of Mr. George and Mrs. Mary Ellen Simister, who is serving with the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. He joined the Ashton Territorials on October 21st, 1914, fought in Gallipoli and came to France in March 1917. He was wounded last March, being shot in the leg, and has since been in hospital in Sheffield. He is but 19 years of age. 

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 8th June 1918.

ASHTON SOLDIER MISSING.

Lance Corporal 350553 JOSEPH SHAW of the 9th  Battalion, Manchester Regiment (T.F.) of 51, Fleet Street, Ashton, son of Mr. Alfred Shaw, and husband of Mrs. Beatrice Shaw, is reported missing, 21st March to 31st. Lance Corporal SHAW went out to Egypt in 1914, and went through all the fighting in the Dardanelles, and came to France in 1917, where he had his first furlough. He was wounded in the Dardanelles and also in France last September. He was married in February this year whilst on furlough. A brother, Private WALTER SHAW, is a prisoner in Germany, and his eldest brother, Private ALFRED SHAW, is serving with the Military Police. Previous to joining the army Lance Corporal SHAW was employed as a spinner at the Minerva Spinning Company. He was 24 years of age. (Joseph Shaw is recorded on the Pozieres Memorial to the missing. His date of death is given as 21.3.1918).

 

 

 

 Published in the Reporter 22nd June 1918.

DIED IN GERMAN HOSPITAL. 

Ashton Man Who Was Wounded and a Prisoner. 

 

 

 Mrs. Andrew, of 35, Leach Street, has had a letter from a British prisoner at Wesel on Rhine, Germany, internment camp, stating that her husband, Private ERNEST ANDREW, formerly of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, died in the hospital there from wounds on April 30th. He was 25 years of age. He joined up in October 1914, went to Egypt and then to the Dardanelles, and later came to France. He was employed at the River Mill, as a spinner. His brother, Private 4250 BERTIE ANDREW, formerly of the Manchester Regiment, has been missing since September 25th 1916, and has been presumed killed. He was serving with the 7th Battalion, Kings Liverpool Regiment at the time. He was 21 years of age. His other brother, Private ALFRED ANDREW is now at Norfolk Hospital suffering from gun shot wounds. He is 19 years of age. The Andrew brothers are the sons of Mr. Alfred & Catherine Andrew, formerly of 77, Church Street, Dukinfield. (Place of burial unrecorded on CWGC for Ernest Andrew. His brother Bertie is recorded on the Theipval Memorial to the missing).

 

 

 

 

 Published in the Reporter 31st August 1918.

DIED DOING HIS DUTY.

Ashton Territorial Killed in Transport Lines.

Mrs. James Buckley, of 32, Gosford Street, Ashton, has received official news that her husband, Private 3224 JAMES BUCKLEY, of the 3/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was killed on July 31st.

Major H.C.GORTON states that Private BUCKLEY was killed by a shell which fell in the transport line. "Your husband died whilst doing his duty, and was buried with another driver near where they fell,"  wrote Major GORTON. Private BUCKLEY joined the forces in September 1915, and went out to Egypt with the 3/9th Manchester Regiment, where he was wounded slightly in the neck. He was afterwards drafted out to France, where he has been about twelve months. He formerly was employed at the New Moss Colliery, and was a member of the St. Peter's Football Club. He is 22 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child. (James Buckley is buried in Oulchy-Le-Chateau Churchyard Extension. He was attached to the Machine Gun Corps, service number 39635, at the time of his death). 

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 31st August 1918.

ASHTON TERRITORIAL.

MILITARY MEDALIST PRESUMED TO HAVE BEEN KILLED.

Mrs. T. Tipton, of 58, Cotton Street, Ashton, has this week received an official message conveying the fate of her husband, Lance Sergeant 350590 TIMOTHY TIPTON, M.M. of the 9th Battalion Manchester Regiment, who is reported to have been killed in action between March 21st and 31st.  He was 24 years of age. A letter has been received from one of his chums who says that he was killed on March 21st on the Somme by a shell. Death was instantaneous. He was a good comrade amongst the lads of his Company, who sadly express their sympathy. Lance Sergeant TIPTON was wounded during the Dardanelles engagement, and was afterwards drafted to France, where he was awarded the Military Medal for leading his section of men into action (further details are illegible). Prior to joining the army, Lance Sergeant TIPTON was employed at the New Moss Colliery. He was the son of Mr. Timothy & Eliza Tipton, of Cotton Street. (Timothy Tipton is recorded on the Pozieres Memorial to the missing. His date of death is given as 21.3.1918).

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 31st August 1918.

HURST SOLDIER KILLED

Mrs. Ethel Newcomb, of 1. Princess Street, Hurst, has received a letter from Private H. LOWE, one of her husbands comrades stating that he was killed in action on August 15th by a sniper. He says,"He died doing his duty as stretcher bearer, and is buried in a soldiers grave. He is greatly missed by all the N.C.O.'s and here in his Company, and he was so well liked. They join you in sharing your grief, and send their deepest sympathy caused by the loss of your husband, Pte. CHARLES W. NEWCOMB."

Pte. 351194 CHARLES W. NEWCOMB joined the 1/9th Manchester Regiment in November 1914, and went out to Egypt, from where he was invalided back home with dysentery. He was drafted out to France about 17 months ago. He was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery, and was presented with the ribbon in May this year. He was formerly a partner minder at the Clarance Mill, Stalybridge. Pte. CHARLES W NEWCOMB was aged 29 years of age and is the son of Robert William and Fanny Newcomb of Hurst, Ashton. (Charles W Newcomb is buried in Mailley Wood Cemetery, Mailley-Maillet. His M.M. was Gazetted on 27.6.1918).

 

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 14th September 1918.

ASHTON MAN AWARDED D.C.M.

Pte. 350714 JOHN MOSS, Manchester Regiment, (Ashton-Under-Lyne), has been awarded the D.C.M. for the following: -  After all the officers and NCO's had become casualties, he took command of the platoon, which had been badly disorganised, and reorganised and led it for many days in continuous action with the greatest bravery and powers of leadership. Time after time he rallied men of other units, and took charge of them. His fine work was beyond praise. (J. MOSS' D.C.M. was Gazetted 3.9.1918).  Additional information : -

The brother of JOHN MOSS, Sgt. 350048 THOMAS MOSS,(formerly 526) was also a member of the Ashton Territorials, having enlisted at Ashton-Under-Lyne on the 13th January 1909 at the age of 19 years. He went out with the battalion to Egypt, and took part in the Gallipoli campaign.  After eight months on the Peninsula he fell ill, and on the 6th August was removed to hospital at Mudros. By the end of January 1916, THOMAS had recovered from illness and he rejoined the battalion at Mena, Cairo. THOMAS, along with the battalion, embarked at Alexandria onboard the Arcadian on the 11th March 1917, bound for Maseilles, France.  He was invalided home on 20th June 1917, suffering from exposure, anemia and breathing difficulties, he was finally demobilised on the 3rd March 1919.  Prior to the outbreak of war he was employed at Thomas Mason & Sons, Oxford Mills, as a cotton spinner.  He married Miss Mary Tassaker in 1910, and they had two sons, Thomas and John. The family resided at 125, Ann Street, Ashton.

  JOHN MOSS' D.C.M. Courtesy of Vincent Lomas. 

  

     

Published in the Reporter 14th September 1918.

ASHTON FOOTBALLER KILLED.

Mrs. Emma Robinson, of 200, Park Street, Ashton, has had official news that her son, Lance Corporal 203482 LEWIS ROBINSON, 1/5th Bn. Manchester Regiment, attached to the Lancashire Fusiliers, and formerly 4505 of the 3/9th Manchester Regiment (Ashton Territorials), was killed in action on August 21st in France. He joined up in December 1915. He was a member of the Tuesday afternoon Football League. (Lewis Robinson is listed on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial to the missing).

  

 

Published in the Reporter 14th September 1918.

KILLED ON HIS BIRTHDAY.

Mr. and Mrs. Slater, of 12, Park Road, Dukinfield, have been informed by the military authorities that their son, Private 350761 GEORGE HARRY SLATER, serving with the 1/6th Manchester Regiment,(formerly of the 9th) was killed in action in France 4th inst., his birthday. He was 24 years of age, single, and by trade was a minder at Thame Valley Thread Mill.  Soon after the outbreak of the war he joined the Ashton Territorials, and had served in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and in France. (George Harry Slater is buried in Varennes Military Cemetery).

 

 

Published in the Reporter 21st September 1918.

SET A FINE EXAMPLE.

Ashton Man Who Was With Territorials for 17 Years.

Mrs. Harry Green Goddard, 31, York Street, Ashton, received news on Tuesday that her husband, Private HARRY GREEN GODDARD, of the 1/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment, was killed in action on August 24th 1918. He was 39 years of age. Chaplain G.A.KENNEDY, Manchesters, writes that he was killed on the night of August 24th. He was in the leading platoon when the battalion were pursuing the Germans, and it was late at night when they came into touch with them. In the sharp skirmish that followed he was hit in the body by a machine gun bullet and died instantly. Lieut. S.C. SENTEN (?) says, "His loss is felt by everyone he came in contact with. He was always cheerful, even in the most trying circumstances, and set a fine example to all."  Private GODDARD was an old member of the Ashton Territorials with which he had been connected for over 17 years, and was the holder of the long service medal. He leaves a widow and five children. Two brothers, Private EDWARD GREEN GODDARD (Lancashire Fusiliers) and Private WILLIE GREEN GODDARD (1/9th Manchester Regiment) are both serving in France.

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 21st September 1918.

SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHER.

One of Four Ashton Brothers Serving Dies of Wounds.

News has this week been received by Mr. William Dean, 6, Trafalgar Square, Ashton, that is fourth son, Private 351250 HERMAN DEAN, of the 2/9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, died from wounds received in action at the Casualty Clearing Station, France on September 5th. He was 30 years of age. One of the nursing sisters states that he was admitted to the hospital on September 2nd suffering from a wound to the right leg and head. He was progressing quite satisfactorily until the 4th of September where the symptoms became worse, and he died at 6.15am the following day. Private DEAN volunteered for active service in October 1914, and went out to the Dardanelles. After the evacuation he was drafted out to France and was wounded on March 21st. He was a teacher at St. Peter's Sunday School. His brother, Corporal HARRY DEAN, is serving with the Mechanical Motor Transport in East Africa. Another brother, Corporal HAROLD DEAN, of the Royal Engineers, has been twice wounded, and expects going out for a third time. His youngest brother, WILLIE DEAN, is training with the Royal Engineers at Newark. (Herman Dean is buried in Fienvillers British Cemetery. He was serving as Pte 205675 in the 1st Bn. Wiltshire Regiment at the time of his death).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 21st September 1918. 

WORTHY OF THE CHOICE.

Ashton Lad Selected as Company Runner.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Landers, of 163, Margaret Street, Ashton, have received news of the death in action of their son, Drummer 350132 ROBERT LANDERS, Manchester Regiment. Lieut. WILSON writes: - "I regret to say that the information you had received unofficially regarding your son was correct. He was killed in action on August 25th, and perhaps you would derive some amount of comfort to know that he endured no pain, but was killed outright by a shell, and so ended his life as he lived, as a good soldier. He was soon picked out when he came to us as a courageous fellow and a good soldier, was selected to act as Company runner, and at once showed himself worthy of the choice. We were all sorry to lose him."  Over six years ago Drummer LANDERS joined the Ashton Territorials, at that time being a member of the Church Lad's Brigade at St. Peter's. He served in Egypt and Gallipoli. He accompanied the battalion to France. He was 23 years of age, and was previously employed as a fitter. A memorials service was held on Sunday at St. Peter's church. (Robert Landers is recorded on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial to the missing).

 

  

Published in the Reporter 28th September 1918.

A PATRIOTIC FAMILY.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Turner, of 136, Old Street, Ashton, have received news that their eldest son, Sergt. 350136 JOHN CHARLES TURNER, of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, was killed on August 30th. He was 24 years of age. He was wounded in the shoulder, and as he was endeavouring to get to the nearest dressing post another bullet hit him in the head and he died instantly. He was associated with the Ashton Territorials two years before the outbreak of the war, and volunteered for active service when they were mobilised. He had been previously wounded, and had also suffered from an attack of fever. He had been acting as drill instructor for a short time. Before he signed for active service he was employed at the New Moss Colliery, where he had worked for about five years. One of his brothers, Private William Turner is serving in the 2/9th Manchester Regiment, and his sister, Sergt. Emily Crane is a member of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps at Warrington.  Sergt. JOHN C. TURNER leaves a young widow, Mrs. Amy Turner.  (John Charles Turner is recorded on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial to the missing. CWGC states that he was serving with C Coy, 1/8th Manchester Regiment at the time of his death).

 

Sgt. JOHN C. TURNER (seated) and Pals. Photo courtesy of Mrs. Barbara Crane. 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 28th September 1918.

FINE SOLDIER AND GOOD FRIEND.

Mrs. Ethel Lee, of 46, Wellington St. Ashton, has received news that her husband Private 35004 TOM LEE, 1/9th Manchester Regiment was killed on September 1st. He was 27 years of age. Captain R.F.HOPWOOD(?) writes expressing his sympathy, and says, "Your husband acted as my servant from 21st August and remained with me until he was killed in action on 1st September 1918. He was a fine soldier and a good friend, and his first consideration was always his Officer, who ever he was serving. At the time he met his death he was doing his duty and setting an example to the rest of the Company by his splendid behaviour." Private LEE was eight years with the Ashton Territorials previous to the war. He volunteered for active service. He was wounded in the neck at Gallipoli in June 1915. Before joining the army he worked as a wagoner at the New Moss Colliery. He leaves a widow and two children. Two brothers, Private WILLIAM LEE (Lancashire Fusiliers) and Private CHARLES LEE (10th Manchester Regt) are serving in France. ( At the time of death, Pte. 260295, formerly 35004 Tom Lee had transferred from the 1/9th Battalion, and was serving in the 13th Battalion, King's Liverpool Regiment. He is buried in Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy). 

 

  

Published in the Reporter 19th October 1918.

AN ONLY SON KILLED.

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Fern, of 113, Union Street, Ashton, have suffered a sad loss in the death of their only son, Lance Corporal 350814 JOHN HENRY FERN, of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, who died from wounds on September 27th. He was 24 years of age and joined the forces in 1914. He went out to Egypt and the Dardanelles with the 1/9th Manchesters, and had been serving in France about 17 months. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Buckley and Crossley's Spindle Works in Dukinfield, and was also a regular attender at St. James' school. His brother-in-law, Private Sydney Hall, of the 3/9th Manchesters, was killed in action in France in 1917. (John Henry Fern is buried at Ribecourt Road Cemetery, Trescault).

 

 

Published in the Reporter 19th October 1918.

TWO DUKINFIELD BROTHERS KILLED.

Mrs. John Bendel, of Dukinfield, has received official news that her husband, Private 350978 JOHN BENDEL of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment died of wounds received in action on September 12th.  He was wounded on September 5th. He had had three years experience as an Ashton Territorial prior to the war being declared, and rejoined in August 1914. He went to the Dardanelles, and afterwards was drafted out to France where he has been for the last 18 months. Previous to joining the army he was employed at Gorton Tank. He attended the Victoria Street Mission Sunday School. His brother, Private 1886 ALBERT BENDEL of the 1/9th Manchesters was killed on 19th June 1915 in the Dardanelles engagement. (John Bendal is buried in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen. His brother Albert Bendel is listed on the Helles Memorial to the missing).

 

 

 

AN ASHTON TERRITORIAL.

Pte. JAMES THOMAS CASE.

 Below is an original letter, dated 26th October 1918, sent to Mrs Case of 14, Ashton Street, Dukinfield Hall, informing her of her husbands death. Pte. 351651 JAMES THOMAS CASE joined the 3/9th battalion, Ashton Territorials in July 1915. He was transferred to the 2/9th Battalion and proceeded to serve with the battalion overseas. On the 15th February 1918, Pte. JAMES T. CASE, along with other men of the 2/9th, was transferred to the 1/5th battalion, with whom he was serving when he subsequently lost his life. He died of wounds on the 2nd September 1918 and is buried in the Adanac Military Cemetery, Miraumont. Pictured right is the original grave marker of James T Case, courtesy of Paul Case. (More poignant  belongings of Pte. 351651 James T. Case are listed in the "Original Papers" section on this website, courtesy of his Great grandson, Mr. Gareth Harrison).

  Click on the ICON to view the grave of James T Case. Click BACK in your browser to return to this website. 

 

 

 

Published in the Reporter 26th October 1918.

DUKINFIELD SOLDIER.

Private ROBERT KANE, Manchester Regiment, of Queen Street, Dukinfield, has been awarded the Military Medal for dressing wounded soldiers under fire while acting as stretcher-bearer, on September 2nd. He was also awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty in June 1918. Private KANE joined the 1/9th Ashton Territorials, Manchester Regiment in November 1914. He was wounded in the head in June 1918. Before he joined the army he was employed at the Bradford Colliery Co. His brother, Private JAMES KANE, is serving in Egypt, and his brother-in-law, Private SAM KENYON, who was in the 1/9th Manchesters, and went through the Dardanelles engagement, has been discharged through being wounded in the stomach. (Robert Kanes MSM was Gazetted on 17.6.1918, his MM was gazetted on 11.2.1919).

 

 

 

 Published in the Reporter 26th October 1918.

AWARDED DCM.

ASHTON MAN'S GALLANTRY UNDER FIRE.

EXTINGUISHED SHELL DUMP.

Sergeant COLIN BARROTT of the machine Gun Corps has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallant and brave action shown whilst extinguishing a fire at a shell dump whilst under heavy enemy gunfire.

Sergeant COLIN BARROTT has been in the army three years. He joined the 2/9th Battalion Manchester Regiment in 1915, and was drafted out to Egypt. He was one of the survivors from the Ivernia which was torpedoed, and was rescued after being in the water about three and a half hours. He was laid up in hospital with pneumonia for some time, and on recovering was drafted out to France. He married Miss Hannah Salt, an Ashton young lady, about thirteen months ago. He was formerly employed at the Planet Foundry, Guidebridge. He is a native of Hurst Nook, and is a member of the Hurst Nook Sunday School.

  

  

 

Published in the Reporter 2nd November 1918.

WHILE WRITING A LETTER

Dukinfield Soldier and a Number of Children Killed.

The sad news has come to hand that Private 350702 JAMES WILLIAM CHAPMAN, of the 1/9th Manchester Regiment, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Chapman, of 34, Furnace Street, Dukinfield, was killed in action on October 14th. From a letter received they learn that he had just come out of the trenches and was sitting behind the headquarters tent writing a letter when a shell came over, and he, along with another soldier, were practically blown to pieces and several others were wounded. Some children who were playing close by were also killed. Private CHAPMAN joined the 1/9th Manchesters in September 1914, and served in Egypt and also the Dardanelles expedition. He had been out in France about one year and nine months, and was over on leave in July last. He had been laid up once with gas poisoning. Previous to joining the army he was employed at the Park Bridge Iron Works. He was 23 years of age. His brother, Private HARRY CHAPMAN, is serving with the 6th(?) Manchesters. (James W Chapman is buried in Beaumont-En-Cambresis Communal Cemetery).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 16th November 1918.

HURST SOLDIER.

 Mr. and Mrs Thomas Clarkson, 35, Princess Street, Hurst, have received official news of the death of their son, Private 2199 JAMES CLARKSON, 1/5th Manchester Regiment, on October 20th (transferred from the 9th battalion). One of his comrades has written to say that he was killed by a shell and that he saw him fall as they were advancing to make an attack. 

Private CLARKSON joined the army when quite a youth, and served for a time in the Militia. On the outbreak of the war he was on special reserve and rejoined the forces in August 1914. He went out to France with the 2/9th Manchesters, and was three times wounded, once in the right foot by shrapnel, another time he was hit by a snipers bullet in the face, and on the third occasion a bullet went through his hip.  His brother-in-law, Able Seaman WILLIAM WOLLEY has served in the Royal Navy for ten years, and another brother-in-law, Rifleman JOHN McBRIDE, is serving with the Royal Irish Fusiliers. He has been wounded once, and has returned to France after being over on hospital leave. (James Clarkson is buried in Belle Vue British Cemetery, Briastre).

 

  

 

Published in the Reporter 7th December 1918.
 
FATHER AND FOUR SONS.
 
One Son Fatally Gassed, Another Wins D.C.M. and Third on Torpedoed Ship.
 
News has been received by Mrs. Littleford, of 178, Old Street, Ashton, that her husband Private 352676 William Littleford, of the Headquarters County Police, 21st Bn. Manchester Regiment, died of gas poisoning in France on October 6th. 2nd Lt. W.R. Birch(?) QC, H.Q. Wrote, "He was a good soldier, and well respected by all who knew him."
 
Private Littleford was a member of the Ashton Territorials, in which he had served for nine years previous to the commencement of hostilities. His time for military service expired in March 1916, but he rejoined and went out to France, and was also for about ten months on the Italian Front. He was wounded in June 1917. He was 28 years of age, and formerly a piecer at the Bow Mill, Dukinfield. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Rosanna Littleford, and also a baby son, William.
His elder brother, Private 1083 Sam Littleford, of the 12th Manchester Regiment, formerly 1/9th, won the D.C.M at Gallipoli. He was wounded in France on March 21st 1918. Another brother, Drummer John Littleford, of the 1/5(?) Welsh Fusiliers was onboard the Transylvania when she was torpedoed on her way to Egypt on 4th May 1917. He was rescued, and has since served in France and Italy. He is present over on sick leave at the Mechanics Institute, Ashton. Another brother, Jim Littleford, is in the Royal Air Force. Their father, Mr. William Littleford, served through the Egyptian Campaign with the Royal Marines in 1886. He is at present employed at the Ashton Gasworks. (William Littleford is buried in Bellicourt British Cemetery. The CWGC states that William was serving with the 21st Bn. Manchester Regiment at the time of his death).
 Click on the Icon to view William Littleford's grave. Click BACK in your browser to return to this website.
The photos of Pte. William Littleford are courtesy of his grandaughter Gill.
 
Pte. 352676 William Littleford (Left) & Pal, 1917.